Tag: infectious disease

Uncovered Cough And Sneeze Help Spread Nasty Disease

Achoo!

Feel like a sneeze or cough coming on? Cover it in a cloth or tissue paper, or even your sleeves, and wash your hands, admonishes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) — and for good reasons, too! Microbial pathogenic agents of a variety of respiratory illnesses, both viral [ranging from the common cold (rhinovirus); influenza (orthomyxovirus); parainfluenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and human metapneumovirus (all paramyxoviruses); severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-Coronavirus)] as well as bacterial [such as those responsible for pneumonia (Streptococcus pneumoniae), whooping cough (Bordetella pertussis), and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis)] are often transmitted by cough, sneeze, and/or unclean hands/palms carrying these germs on their surfaces.

Continue reading

The MIDAS touch: NIGMS Propels Infectious Disease Research To Golden Age via Computational Modeling

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), a part of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), was established in 1962 via an Act of Congress for the “conduct and support of research and research training in the general or basic medical sciences and related natural or behavioral sciences”, especially in areas which are interdisciplinary for other institutes under the Act, or alternatively, which fall under no institute’s purview. In these 52 years, the NIGMS has acquitted itself laudably as one of premier funding agencies that support basic research into understanding biological processes, disease diagnostics, treatment and prevention. At any given time, NIGMS supports close to 5000 research grants, accounting for more than 1 in every 10 grants funded by NIH as a whole, and has the distinction of funding the Nobel Prize-winning research of 75 scientists.

Continue reading

Bug’s “To-do”: Lose a few genes; Cause the Black Death

ResearchBlogging.org

Yersinia pestis (YP) is a rod-shaped bacterium associated with the pandemic plagues that have devastated human civilization multiple times. According to available genetic evidence, an ancestral bacterium called Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YPT) gave rise to this bug in China, from where it spread repeatedly westward to the rest of the world causing disease in both animals and humans.

Continue reading

Yersinia pest(is) a persistent bug(ger)

The first known use of the noun ‘plague’ occurred in the 14th century, according to The Merriam-Webster. The word has Latin, Old High German and Greek roots, all of which point to tragedy, lamentation, and curse. In modern English, the severity of the word has become diluted somewhat; it is now also used to depict unwelcome, nuisance events or mild disturbances. But it is important not to be unmindful of the disaster, the destruction, the calamity – untold misery and suffering of countless people, that this word came to represent during certain periods of human history.

Continue reading